Guild Heritage House, Bristol

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Client
Brave & Poor Ltd
Local Authority
Bristol City Council
Status
Planning
Constraints
Conservation area, building of merit

The conversion and extension of an important historic building located within the Old Market conservation area in central Bristol, providing a mix of residential and commercial use.

Guild Heritage is an impressive Edwardian building, opened in 1914 for the training of children with disabilities, and later used as offices by Bristol City Council. The proposals comprise the retention of most of the ground floor, including the large central hall, for office space. The first floor and one wing of the ground floor, are to be converted into five residential apartments, with a further three apartments accommodated within new-build elements on the two single-storey wings.

Given its status as a 'Building of Merit' within the conservation area, as much of the original building fabric as possible has been retained, and insensitive alterations removed. The main entrance has been opened up, and original lightwells restored at the core of the building, providing natural light and ventilation.

Workspace within the central hall has been increased with the addition of a mezzanine gallery, and on the first floor residential extensions are designed as simple zinc-clad boxes - a clear contrast of new against the old.

The conversion and extension of an important historic building located within the Old Market conservation area in central Bristol, providing a mix of residential and commercial use.

Client
Brave & Poor Ltd
Local Authority
Bristol City Council
Status
Planning
Constraints
Conservation area, building of merit

Guild Heritage is an impressive Edwardian building, opened in 1914 for the training of children with disabilities, and later used as offices by Bristol City Council. The proposals comprise the retention of most of the ground floor, including the large central hall, for office space. The first floor and one wing of the ground floor, are to be converted into five residential apartments, with a further three apartments accommodated within new-build elements on the two single-storey wings.

Given its status as a 'Building of Merit' within the conservation area, as much of the original building fabric as possible has been retained, and insensitive alterations removed. The main entrance has been opened up, and original lightwells restored at the core of the building, providing natural light and ventilation.

Workspace within the central hall has been increased with the addition of a mezzanine gallery, and on the first floor residential extensions are designed as simple zinc-clad boxes - a clear contrast of new against the old.

FIT ARCHITECTS